No new cases of COVID-19 in RC on Tuesday

Statewide Testing Positivity Rate: 2.89%.

Deaths: We are happy to report no new deaths today. We have experienced a total of 382 deaths resulting in a 1.78% mortality rate (about 1 in 56) among known cases. This compares with a 1.44% mortality rate at the state level and a 1.8% mortality rate at the national level.

Hospitalizations: We presently have 24 cases in the hospital. This is 4 more than what we reported yesterday. We have had a total of 1,190 hospitalizations resulting in a 5.56% hospitalization rate (about 1 in 18) among known cases. The state hospitalization rate is 4.87%. The latest data shows that 91.11% of Lake Cumberland’s ICU beds are filled, and 27.87% of ventilator capacity is being utilized.

Total (Cumulative) Cases: The Lake Cumberland District has experienced a total of 21,418 cases since the onset of the outbreak. This means that 10.25% of our total population has been a confirmed case. However, we do not know how many additional people may have had COVID-19 and were either asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic and never tested. Of our total cases, 0.41% are reinfections.

Released (Not contagious) Cases: We released 21 cases today from isolation. Released cases include: Green: 1; McCreary: 8; Pulaski: 9; Russell: 1; and, Wayne: 2. In all, we have released 97.5% of our total cases.

Active (Current) Cases: We added 16 more cases today than we had deceased and/or released cases. This leaves us with 162 active cases in our district across 9 of our district’s 10 counties. On 12/10/2020 we were at our peak number of active cases, 1,342.

Where Did Cases Visit Prior to Isolation: The most common places cases visited prior to isolation are (in descending order): Family, Businesses, Medical Facilities, and Schools. Of our active cases, 3% can not be tied back to another known case (community-spread cases).

New Cases: We report that our total case count has increased by 37 today: Adair: 2; Casey: 9; McCreary: 9; Pulaski: 14; Taylor: 2; and, Wayne: 1. Our current new case growth rate is: 1.001. This means our total case count is projected to double every 623.45 days. The most new cases we ever added in a single day was on 12/30/2020 when we added 301 cases. Today’s new cases include:

Adair: A 28-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Adair: A 2-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 61-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 74-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 79-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 18-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 11-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 29-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Casey: A 51-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 30-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 56-year-old female who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 75-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 21-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
McCreary: A 24-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 64-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 16-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
McCreary: A 48-year-old female who is hospitalized, Asymptomatic;
McCreary: A 19-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 31-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 12-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 83-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 67-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 19-year-old male who is released, Resolved;
Pulaski: A 50-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 37-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 46-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 57-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 29-year-old female who is released, Resolved;
Pulaski: A 23-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 71-year-old male who is hospitalized, still symptomatic;
Pulaski: A 10 months -old male who is released, Resolved;
Taylor: A 36-year-old female who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Taylor: A 78-year-old male who is self-isolated, still symptomatic;
Wayne: A 78-year-old female who is released, still symptomatic;

Now the COVID-19 vaccinations are open to everyone! Let’s finish strong and everyone get the vaccine as soon as you can.

Today we added fewer cases than for the same period last week, so our 7-day-average incidence rate went down slightly. Keep in mind, some of our 7-day-incidence data will be skewed over the next few days as we are reconciling our data against the state data. Our 7-day incidence chart is showing 6 counties in the “yellow-community-spread” category, Clinton, Cumberland, Green, Russell, Taylor, and Wayne; 3 counties in the “orange-accelerated” range of community-spread: Adair, Casey, and Pulaski; and 1 county in the “red-critical” range: McCreary. It should be noted that we have no active cases in Cumberland.

Don’t forget that at both the world level and in several states, we are seeing sharp increases in new COVID-19 cases. Therefore, please do not assume that the pandemic is completely behind us and take the vaccine as soon as you can. Also, until the vaccine is widely available, and a significant percentage of the population has taken it, let’s all do our part in slowing the spread of COVID-19 by wearing our face coverings, avoiding crowds (especially in confined spaces), social distancing when around others, increasing our hand hygiene, increasing our general sanitation, and by avoiding the touching of our faces.

The Lake Cumberland area has experienced 21,418 cumulative confirmed cases and there have been 430,073 confirmed COVID-19 cases across all 120 Kentucky Counties as of today (this includes 429,841 statewide plus 232 cases in Lake Cumberland not in the Governor’s/Department for Public Health’s daily report). Regardless of the confirmed case count for any Lake Cumberland County, we believe COVID-19 to be widespread. The LCDHD is working tirelessly, including nights and weekends, to identify and contact all those with whom any positive case may have come into close contact, and to follow up with positive cases when ready to be released. Additionally, we are striving diligently to follow up on business-related complaints regarding noncompliance with the COVID-19 guidance. We are also working with any community partner that requests assistance for prevention or post-exposure planning/response. Finally, we are working with all community partners regarding vaccination planning.

About Zac Oakes 857 Articles
Zac Oakes is the News Director and Digital Content Contributor for LakerCountry.com and Laker Country WJRS 104.9 FM.